Tag Archives: experts

Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine ingredients are pretty standard, experts say

Experts say the ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer and German partner BioNTech, which was authorized Friday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, looks pretty standard for a vaccine.

In a letter to the FDA, Pfizer listed the ingredients in its vaccine. They can be organized into four basic categories:

Active ingredient

Fats

  • lipids (0.43 mg (4-hydroxybutyl)azanediyl)bis(hexane-6,1-diyl)bis(2-hexyldecanoate), 0.05 mg 2[(polyethylene glycol)-2000]-N,N-ditetradecylacetamide, 0.09 mg 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine, and 0.2 mg cholesterol)

Salts

  • 0.01 mg potassium chloride

  • 0.01 mg monobasic potassium phosphate

  • 0.36 mg sodium chloride

  • 0.07 mg dibasic sodium phosphate dihydrate

Sugar

Coronavirus updates: Vaccine distribution has begun; FDA officials assure public that Pfizer vaccine is safe

“Nothing too surprising there,” said Dr. Matthew Heinz, a hospitalist based in Tucson, Arizona. “It’s a normal way of packaging up medications for people.”

The only active ingredient in the vaccine is the messenger RNA encoding the viral spike of SARS-CoV-2.

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Pfizer COVID vaccine ingredients are pretty standard, experts say

Experts say the ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer and German partner BioNTech, which was authorized Friday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, looks pretty standard for a vaccine.

In a letter to the FDA, Pfizer listed the ingredients in its vaccine. They can be organized into four basic categories:

Active Ingredient

Fats

  • lipids (0.43 mg (4-hydroxybutyl)azanediyl)bis(hexane-6,1-diyl)bis(2-hexyldecanoate), 0.05 mg 2[(polyethylene glycol)-2000]-N,N-ditetradecylacetamide, 0.09 mg 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine, and 0.2 mg cholesterol)

Salts

  • 0.01 mg potassium chloride

  • 0.01 mg monobasic potassium phosphate

  • 0.36 mg sodium chloride

  • 0.07 mg dibasic sodium phosphate dihydrate

Sugar

Coronavirus updates: Vaccine distribution has begun; FDA officials assure public that Pfizer vaccine is safe

“Nothing too surprising there,” said Dr. Matthew Heinz, a hospitalist based in Tucson, Arizona. “It’s a normal way of packaging up medications for people.”

The only active ingredient in the vaccine is the messenger RNA encoding the viral spike of SARS-CoV-2.

Read More

Read More »

People are editing photos of celebrities to give them Instagram-inspired faces. Experts say it could be harmful.

People are editing photos of celebrities to give them Instagram-inspired faces. Experts say it could be harmful.

Instagram account @goddess.women edited this photo of Julia Roberts. <p class="copyright"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFNN7OBJTOm/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Steve Granitz/Getty Images and Goddess Women/Instagram" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Steve Granitz/Getty Images and Goddess Women/Instagram</a></p>
Instagram account @goddess.women edited this photo of Julia Roberts.
  • Numerous Instagram accounts are editing photos of actors, models, and musicians almost beyond the point of recognition.
  • While the anonymous editors haven’t explained the purpose of their accounts, they seemingly aim to give celebrities certain idealized features, like pore-less skin and straight teeth.
  • Some celebrities seem to like the edits and occasionally re-post them, though other social-media users have criticized the pages for creating unrealistic beauty standards.
  • Experts argue that looking at heavily-edited photos, as well as “transformation” images, can be extremely harmful to viewers and lead them to body-shame themselves.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Stars like Rihanna and Julia Roberts are often considered some of the most beautiful women in the world. But online, pictures of these celebrities and other Hollywood stars are being edited almost beyond recognition.

Across Instagram,

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Is the fox-eye makeup trend racially insensitive? Here’s what Asian cosmetic experts had to say

Whether you’re scrolling through TikTok or seeing your favorite influencers’ posts on social media, you may have (knowingly or unknowingly) come across the viral fox-eye trend.

The latest makeup fad involves using eyeliner, concealer, false lashes and other cosmetics to emulate the elongated look of almond-shaped eyes – one that resembles, you guessed it, a fox.

The look is fairly easy to achieve. Legacy makeup brand Maybelline‘s tutorial explains how to do it in only six steps, and Gigi Hadid’s makeup artist Erin Parsons showcased the look in a four minute Instagram video.

Eyeliner is often used to elongate the outer and inner corners of the eyes, while concealer can minimize the eyebrow’s arch to create a straight-brow look. A popular trademark of the fox-eye trend, however, is its pose. Wearers of the new fad have been showcasing their completed makeup by pulling back the corner of their eyes. 

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