Is the fox-eye makeup trend racially insensitive? Here’s what Asian cosmetic experts had to say

Whether you’re scrolling through TikTok or seeing your favorite influencers’ posts on social media, you may have (knowingly or unknowingly) come across the viral fox-eye trend.

The latest makeup fad involves using eyeliner, concealer, false lashes and other cosmetics to emulate the elongated look of almond-shaped eyes – one that resembles, you guessed it, a fox.

The look is fairly easy to achieve. Legacy makeup brand Maybelline‘s tutorial explains how to do it in only six steps, and Gigi Hadid’s makeup artist Erin Parsons showcased the look in a four minute Instagram video.

Eyeliner is often used to elongate the outer and inner corners of the eyes, while concealer can minimize the eyebrow’s arch to create a straight-brow look. A popular trademark of the fox-eye trend, however, is its pose. Wearers of the new fad have been showcasing their completed makeup by pulling back the corner of their eyes. 

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‘Here’s Hoping Harris Will Break the Mold of How Women Are Treated on the Stump’

Will it be different this time?

Female vice presidential candidates appeared on major party tickets in 1984 and 2008, and in 2016, a woman headed the ticket. Each time, headlines heralded the historic choice; each time, for any number of reasons, the ticket lost. Those races also gave us a window into how women running for executive office are treated in the U.S.: The candidates were more likely than men to be questioned about their spouses; their attire and looks often became a part of the story; they had to make extra effort to show they were “tough” enough to serve.

Now that Sen. Kamala Harris has become the third female VP candidate on a major party ticket in history, Politico Magazine asked some smart female political observers to tell us: How will things be different for this VP choice, for this woman, and for this race? Or has nothing

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When will dressing rooms open again? Here’s where you can try on clothes and where you can’t during coronavirus.

As stores across the nation started reopening amid the coronavirus pandemic, many opened without fitting rooms.

While some retailers have started to reopen their dressing rooms in select locations – one step closer to a pre-COVID-19 shopping experience – others are keeping them closed indefinitely. 

Even though it is a hassle to purchase items without trying on – you have gotten the wrong size or it’s unflattering – some shoppers may be hesitant to try on clothes during the pandemic. 

According to a First Insight consumer survey of more than 1,000 people, which was conducted in late April, 65% of women and 54% of men say they will not feel safe trying on clothes in dressing rooms.

Masks required: Walmart, Target among retailers adding face masks requirements due to COVID-19. See the full list.

Malls amid COVID-19: Can shopping malls survive the coronavirus pandemic and a new slate of permanent

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Got sun spots on your skin? Here’s how to treat them in the summer

Dark spots are common skin concerns for both men and women. With the stress of COVID-19 and the the extra-hot June we are having in South Florida, melasma and other pigmentation problems can get worse.

Many dermatologists are only seeing emergency visits, but our practice and some others are treating skin pigmentation problems via telemedicine. If you cannot get an appointment with a dermatologist for your pigmentation issue, here are some tips.

Wear SPF even when indoors

Blue light from your phone and computer screen have been shown to increase skin pigmentation. For that reason, the most important product to use on your face every morning is SPF. Look for SPF with iron oxides, which are the best blockers for blue light.

I like EltaMD UV Elements SPF. Another great option with iron oxides is Dermablend facial foundation.

Skin-lightening ingredients to use in summer

Some skin-lightening ingredients can cause

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