People are editing photos of celebrities to give them Instagram-inspired faces. Experts say it could be harmful.

Instagram account @goddess.women edited this photo of Julia Roberts. <p class="copyright"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFNN7OBJTOm/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Steve Granitz/Getty Images and Goddess Women/Instagram" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Steve Granitz/Getty Images and Goddess Women/Instagram</a></p>
Instagram account @goddess.women edited this photo of Julia Roberts.
  • Numerous Instagram accounts are editing photos of actors, models, and musicians almost beyond the point of recognition.
  • While the anonymous editors haven’t explained the purpose of their accounts, they seemingly aim to give celebrities certain idealized features, like pore-less skin and straight teeth.
  • Some celebrities seem to like the edits and occasionally re-post them, though other social-media users have criticized the pages for creating unrealistic beauty standards.
  • Experts argue that looking at heavily-edited photos, as well as “transformation” images, can be extremely harmful to viewers and lead them to body-shame themselves.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Stars like Rihanna and Julia Roberts are often considered some of the most beautiful women in the world. But online, pictures of these celebrities and other Hollywood stars are being edited almost beyond recognition.

Across Instagram,

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Fears About Transgender People Are a Distraction From the Real Struggles All Women Face

In recent weeks, my DMs have been flooded with messages from well-meaning acquaintances, many asking precisely what was transphobic about J.K. Rowling’s self-published essay, “TERF Wars.” (In summary: a lot.) “TERF Wars” was, coincidentally, the title of a chapter in my memoir, The Gender Games. I wonder if she’s read it?

Her piece contained nothing you wouldn’t find in ‘gender critical’ forums and op-eds: that the freedoms of transgender women impinge on those of cisgender (not trans) women. In subsequent tweets, Rowling also compared trans-affirming healthcare to conversion therapy, and suggested that young trans men are merely confused lesbians. In all this, we are to understand that Rowling is not transphobic, but scared.

Rowling’s words were well-timed to coincide with a governmental review of U.K. legislation which allows transgender people to legally change their gender on their birth certificate. The Gender Recognition Act 2004 was — at the time

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