Three things we can learn from contemporary Muslim women’s fashion

<span class="caption">Ilhan Omar, a Somali American, who was elected from Minnesota’s 5th congressional district, will be the first woman in U.S. Congress to wear a hijab.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://www.apimages.com/metadata/Index/Minnesota-Somali-Lawmaker-Harassed/beaa99bc05ae4dcaa1d59f32cc5df55a/27/0" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AP Photo/Jim Mone, File">AP Photo/Jim Mone, File</a></span>
Ilhan Omar, a Somali American, who was elected from Minnesota’s 5th congressional district, will be the first woman in U.S. Congress to wear a hijab. AP Photo/Jim Mone, File

Major art museums have realized there is much to learn from clothing that is both religiously coded and fashion forward.

In 2018, the Metropolitan Museum of Art hosted a fashion exhibition inspired by the Catholic faith titled “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and Catholic Imagination.” With more than 1.6 million visitors, it was the most popular exhibit in the Met’s history.

That same year the de Young Museum of San Francisco had the first major exhibit devoted to the Islamic fashion scene. “Contemporary Muslim Fashions” displayed 80 swoon-worthy ensembles – glamorous gowns, edgy streetwear, conceptual couture – loosely organized by region and emphasizing distinct textile traditions. This exhibit wa a bold statement of cultural appreciation during a time of heightened anti-Muslim rhetoric

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